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Biomarkers & Drug Targets
Breast Cancer Patients With BRCA Gene Diagnosed Almost Eight Years Earlier Than Generation Before PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 15 September 2011 00:41
Women with a deleterious gene mutation are diagnosed with breast cancer almost eight years earlier than relatives of the previous generation who also had the disease and/or ovarian cancer, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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Researcher Sees Spring-Like Protein as Key to Muscle Behavior PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 13 September 2011 00:47
An idea with its origins in ballistic prey catching -- the way toads and chameleons snatch food with their tongues -- may change fundamental views of muscle movement while powering a new approach to prosthetics.
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Novel Approach Scores First Success Against Elusive Cancer Gene PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 13 September 2011 00:33
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have successfully disrupted the function of a cancer gene involved in the formation of most human tumors by tampering with the gene's "on" switch and growth signals, rather than targeting the gene itself. The results, achieved in multiple myeloma cells, offer a promising strategy for treating not only myeloma but also many other cancer types driven by the gene MYC, the study authors say.
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Loss of Key Estrogen Regulator May Lead to Metabolic Syndrome and Atherosclerosis PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 10 September 2011 00:32
UCLA researchers demonstrated that loss of a key protein that regulates estrogen and immune activity in the body could lead to aspects of metabolic syndrome, a combination of conditions that can cause Type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and cancer.
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Key Function of Mutation in Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Gene Discovered PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 08 September 2011 00:59
It is widely known that mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene significantly increase the chance of developing breast and ovarian cancers, but the mechanisms at play are not fully understood.
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New Class of Anti-Diabetic Compound Established PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 08 September 2011 00:04
In a joint study, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute and Harvard University's Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have established a new class of anti-diabetic compound that targets a unique molecular switch.
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New Understanding of Role of Telomeres in Tumor Growth PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 06 September 2011 00:13
The first report of the presence of alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) in cancers arising from the bladder, cervix, endometrium, esophagus, gallbladder, liver, and lung was published September 1 in The American Journal of Pathology.
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Third Genetic Link to Osteoarthritis Discovered PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 03 September 2011 00:14
Researchers have just revealed a new gene associated with osteoarthritis. This is only the third gene to be identified for this painful and debilitating disease that affects more than 40 per cent of people aged more than 70 years.
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Genetic Link to Mesothelioma Discovered PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 01 September 2011 00:52
Scientists have found that individuals who carry a mutation in a gene called BAP1 are susceptible to developing two forms of cancer -- mesothelioma, and melanoma of the eye. Additionally, when these individuals are exposed to asbestos or similar mineral fibers, their risk of developing mesothelioma, an aggressive cancer of the lining of the chest and abdomen, may be markedly increased.
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New Prostate Cancer Screening Test Shows Promise for Diagnosis PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 30 August 2011 00:58
A new prostate screening test developed by AnalizaDx, Inc., a Cleveland-based biotech company, and studied by researchers at the Seidman Cancer Center at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center along with colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic, the Veterans Administration Boston Healthcare and the National Cancer Institute, may prove to be a promising new tool in the diagnosis of prostate cancer.
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X-Ray Protein Probe Leads to Potential Anticancer Tactic PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 15 September 2011 00:38
Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a new type of potential anticancer drug. The compound, named FOBISIN, targets 14-3-3 proteins, important for the runaway growth of cancer cells.
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Cancer: Antibodies Can Directly Target Oncoproteins Inside Cancer Cells to Suppress Aggressive Cancer Growth PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 13 September 2011 00:44
Scientists at A*STAR's Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) have made a landmark discovery in the battle against the rapid spread of aggressive cancers associated with PRL-3 oncoprotein[1]. Contrary to the current accepted theory that antibodies can only bind to cancer proteins found on the cancer cell surface, the IMCB team led by Dr Zeng Qi is the first to discover that antibodies can in fact directly target intracellular oncoproteins like PRL-3 that reside within the cancer cells to suppress cancer growth successfully.
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A Step Toward a Saliva Test for Cancer PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 10 September 2011 00:33
A new saliva test can measure the amount of potential carcinogens stuck to a person's DNA -- interfering with the action of genes involved in health and disease -- and could lead to a commercial test to help determine risks for cancer and other diseases, scientists reported in Denver during the 242nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
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New Strategy for Overcoming Resistance to Targeted Cancer Drug PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 10 September 2011 00:30
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and colleagues overseas have discovered a pair of backup circuits in cancer cells that enable the cells to dodge the effect of a widely used cancer drug. Jamming those circuits with targeted therapies may heighten or restore the drug's potency, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 issue of Science Translational Medicine.
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New HIV Vaccine Approach Targets Desirable Immune Cells PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 08 September 2011 00:17
Researchers at Duke University Medical Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School have demonstrated an approach to HIV vaccine design that uses an altered form of HIV's outer coating or envelope protein.
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Gene Defect Predisposes People to Leukemia PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 08 September 2011 00:02
A new genetic defect that predisposes people to acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplasia has been discovered. The mutations were found in the GATA2 gene.
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New Chemical Reagent Turns Mouse Brain Transparent PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 03 September 2011 00:16
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan's flagship research organization, have developed a ground-breaking new aqueous reagent which literally turns biological tissue transparent.
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Positive Results for Phase III Pediatric Trial with Eisai’s Zonegran Epilepsy Drug PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 03 September 2011 00:07

Eisai reported positive data from a Phase III trial evaluating the antiepilepsy drug Zonegran® (zonisamide) as adjunctive therapy in pediatric patients with partial-onset seizures. The placebo-controlled CATZ study included 207 patients aged 6–17 years with partial-onset seizures, who were already taking one or two antiepileptic drugs.

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Detailed Map of Gene Activity in Mouse Brain Completed PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 01 September 2011 00:07
A new atlas of gene expression in the mouse brain provides insight into how genes work in the outer part of the brain called the cerebral cortex. In humans, the cerebral cortex is the largest part of the brain, and the region responsible for memory, sensory perception and language.
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Could a Tumor Suppressor Also Fight Obesity? Research Reveals Hormone Receptor GCC's Role in Appetite PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 30 August 2011 00:56
The hormone receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) has been established as a suppressor of colorectal cancer tumors, but new evidence from Thomas Jefferson University suggests it may also help fight one of the country's biggest pandemics: obesity.
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