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Bio-Chip & Nanotechnology
Pioneering Medical Nanotechnology Offers New Cancer Breakthrough Hope PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 17 April 2009 08:57
A multi-disciplinary team of scientists from the University of Leicester could be potentially paving the way for the development of a powerful new strategy for both the early diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.
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Biocompatible Materials for Rapid Prototyping PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 15 April 2009 09:07
The implantation of integrated biomedical devices to the human body provides challenges to engineering materials science and biology. The demand for metallic and polymeric biomaterials is greatly increasing because of the rapid growth of the world’s population, the increasing proportion of older people and the high functional requirements of younger people.
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Engineers Create DNA Sensors that Could Identify Cancer Using Material Only One Atom Thick PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 15 April 2009 08:03
Kansas State University engineers think the possibilities are deep for a very thin material.
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Electronics: Keeping the Heat Down PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 13 April 2009 09:01
Electronic products are having to accommodate more and more components, all of which generate heat. Too much heat could put laptops and other devices out of action, so manufacturers equip them with metal plates to discharge it. A new composite can do this better.
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New Method Could Lead to Narrower Chip Patterns PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 10 April 2009 13:22
Researchers at MIT have found a novel method for etching extremely narrow lines on a microchip, using a material that can be switched from transparent to opaque, and vice versa, just by exposing it to certain wavelengths of light.
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Magnetic Nano-'shepherds' Organize Cells PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 09 April 2009 09:37
The power of magnetism may address a major problem facing bioengineers as they try to create new tissue -- getting human cells to not only form structures, but to stimulate the growth of blood vessels to nourish that growth.
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Chemists Create Bipedal, Autonomous DNA Walker PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 07 April 2009 07:45
Chemists at New York University and Harvard University have created a bipedal, autonomous DNA "walker" that can mimic a cell's transportation system. The device, which marks a step toward more complex synthetic molecular motor systems, is described in the most recent issue of the journal Science.
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Silicon Micro-Islands and Nano-Spikes Channel Water on Glass Slides PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 02 April 2009 15:35
Working at the nanoscale level, University of Arkansas engineering researchers have created stable superhydrophilic surfaces on a glass substrate. The surfaces, made of randomly placed and densely distributed micron-sized silicon islands with nano-sized spikes, allow water to quickly penetrate textures and spread over the surface.
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First Ever Video of Dynamics of Carbon Atoms Makes Spintronic-based Computing Look More Promising PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 02 April 2009 15:25
Science fiction fans still have another two months of waiting for the new Star Trek movie, but fans of actual science can feast their eyes now on the first movie ever of carbon atoms moving along the edge of a graphene crystal. Given that graphene – single-layered sheets of carbon atoms arranged like chicken wire – may hold the key to the future of the electronics industry, the audience for this new science movie might also reach blockbuster proportions.
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First High-resolution Images of Bone, Tooth and Shell Formation PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 30 March 2009 09:12
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have for the first time made high-resolution images of the earliest stages of bone formation. They used the world’s most advanced electron microscope to make three-dimensional images of the nano-particles that are at the heart of the process.
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Scorpion Venom with Nanoparticles Slows Spread of Brain Cancer PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 17 April 2009 08:10

By combining nanoparticles with a scorpion venom compound already being investigated for treating brain cancer, University of Washington researchers found they could cut the spread of cancerous cells by 98 percent, compared to 45 percent for the scorpion venom alone.

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Nanoparticles Harnessed to Track Cancer-cell Changes PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 15 April 2009 09:04
The more dots there are, the more accurate a picture you get when you connect them. A new imaging technology could give scientists the ability to simultaneously measure as many as 100 or more distinct features in or on a single cell. In a disease such as cancer, that capability would provide a much better picture of what's going on in individual tumor cells.
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Tracking Down the Effect of Nanoparticles PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 13 April 2009 15:52
Cerium oxide is a ceramic nano-abrasive. Scientists have now examined, under conditions close to reality, what happens when it is breathed in and deposited on the lung surface. Initially, the result was rather reassuring.
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New Security and Medical Sensor Devices Made Possible By Fundamental Physics Development in Metallic Nanostructures PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 13 April 2009 08:39
Scientists have designed tiny new sensor structures that could be used in novel security devices to detect poisons and explosives, or in highly sensitive medical sensors, according to research published tomorrow (8 April) in Nano Letters.
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Engineers Develop Method to Disperse Chemically Modified Graphene in Organic Solvents PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 09 April 2009 09:40
A method for creating dispersed and chemically modified graphene sheets in a wide variety of organic solvents has been developed by a University of Texas at Austin engineering team led by Professor Rod Ruoff, opening the door to use graphene in a host of important materials and applications such as conductive films, polymer composites, ultracapacitors, batteries, paints, inks and plastic electronics.
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First Tri-continuous Mesoporous Silica Complex Structure Developed PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 07 April 2009 07:48
Singapore's Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) has developed the first tri-continuous mesoporous material using a unique surfactant template. This completely new porous structure previously been predicted only mathematically (see reference below).
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DNA-based Assembly Line for Precision Nano-cluster Construction PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 07 April 2009 07:43
Building on the idea of using DNA to link up nanoparticles — particles measuring mere billionths of a meter — scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have designed a molecular assembly line for predictable, high-precision nano-construction.
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Superhydrophobic: Self-cleaning, Low-reflectivity Treatment Boosts Efficiency for Photovoltaic Cells PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 02 April 2009 15:33
Using two different types of chemical etching to create features at both the micron and nanometer size scales, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a surface treatment that boosts the light absorption of silicon photovoltaic cells in two complementary ways.
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Magnetic Nano-'shepherds' Organize Cells PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 31 March 2009 15:50
The power of magnetism may address a major problem facing bioengineers as they try to create new tissue -- getting human cells to not only form structures, but to stimulate the growth of blood vessels to nourish that growth.
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Lab-on-a-chip Homes in on How Cancer Cells Break Free PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 30 March 2009 09:06
Johns Hopkins engineers have invented a method that could be used to help figure out how cancer cells break free from neighboring tissue, an "escape" that can spread the disease to other parts of the body. The new lab-on-a-chip, described in the March issue of the journal Nature Methods, could lead to better cancer therapies.
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