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Bio-Chip & Nanotechnology
Single Molecules As Electric Conductors PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 20 July 2009 00:00

Researchers from Graz University of Technology, Humboldt University in Berlin,  M.I.T.,  Montan University in Leoben and  Georgia Institute of Technology report an important advance in the understanding of electrical conduction through single molecules.

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Superconductivity: Which One Of These Is Not Like The Other? PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 20 July 2009 00:00

Superconductivity appears to rely on very different mechanisms in two varieties of iron-based superconductors. The insight comes from research groups that are making bold statements about the correct description of superconductivity in iron-based compounds in two papers about to be published in journals of the American Physical Society.

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IBN Scientists Discover New Method for the Facile Synthesis of a Wide Range of Nanoparticles with Multiple Functionalities PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 15 July 2009 09:34

anostructured materials have garnered great interest worldwide due to their unique size-dependent properties for chemical, electronic, structural, medical and consumer applications.

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DNA Sorts Carbon Nanotubes PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 15 July 2009 08:50

http://images.iop.org/objects/nano/news/thumb/8/7/9/tubes.jpgCarbon nanotubes are relatively easy to grow, but sorting these tiny tubes according to their electronic properties is a time consuming and costly task. Now, however, researchers in the US have invented a way of isolating different types of nanotube by mixing them with DNA. Although the technique is currently too expensive to be commercially viable, the scientists believe that it could someday be used to create high-quality carbon nanotubes for electronics and other applications.

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Design Tool for Materials with a Memory PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 13 July 2009 09:30

http://www.fraunhofer.de/en/Images/md07_fo6m_tcm63-12907.jpgShape memory alloys can “remember” a condition. If they are deformed, a temperature change can be enough to bring them back to their original shape. A simulation calculates the characteristics of these materials.

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T-shaped Probe Exposes Protein Elasticity PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 10 July 2009 08:27

http://images.iop.org/objects/nano/news/8/7/5/afm1.jpgResearchers in the US have used a modified atomic force microscope to find the flexible regions of a protein. The motion of proteins can play important roles in their biological function and therefore understanding which parts of the molecule can easily bend — and how this suppleness is affected by the presence of other molecules — could help in the development of new drugs.

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Nanopores Could Make Molecular-sized Coulter Counter PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 10 July 2009 08:17

http://images.iop.org/objects/nano/news/thumb/8/7/8/090708a-2.jpgA tiny pore drilled into a semiconductor can rapidly distinguish between different molecules, such as DNA and RNA, in a solution as they pass through. This is the first time that different biomolecule types within a mixture have been identified using such pores. The new technique, developed by researchers at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at Delft University in the Netherlands, is extremely fast and might be used to make a molecular-scale Coulter Counter for testing blood.

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New Way To Make Sensors That Detect Toxic Chemcials PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 08 July 2009 10:02

http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/patriciamorris.jpgOhio State University researchers have developed a new method for making extremely pure, very small metal-oxide nanoparticles.

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Physics Research With Atomic Force Microscope Could Lead To Better Health Care PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 08 July 2009 09:27

http://www.k-state.edu/media/newsreleases/jul09/LinearRipples_examples.jpgRobert Szoszkiewicz, an assistant professor of physics at K-State, is continuing research on molecules both singularly and as a group. His study of proteins as a single molecule shows promise to help scientists understand the causes of diseases like some cancers. Meanwhile, his research on bunched molecules could lead to a more efficient way to identify antibodies in blood.

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Integrated Optical Trap Holds Particles for On-chip Analysis PDF Print E-mail
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Monday, 06 July 2009 08:37

http://www.ucsc.edu/news_events/img/2009/06/microbeads.jpgA new type of optical particle trap can be used to manipulate bacteria, viruses and other particles on a chip as part of an integrated optofluidic platform. The optical trap is the latest innovation from researchers at the Jack Baskin School of Engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who are developing new sensor technology for biomedical analysis and other applications.

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New Method To Encapsulate Substances In Nanospheres PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 20 July 2009 00:00

A group of researchers at the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CIN2), belonging to the Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) located at the UAB Research Park, and the UAB Department of Chemistry have developed and patented a method which obtains minute organometallic capsules ranging from micrometric to nanometric sizes. These will encapsulate substances in nanospheres containing intrinsic metal properties, such as magnetism, fluorescence or conductivity, which could be useful when applied to radiodiagnostics, electronics or sensors.

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Researchers Working On How Gold Nanoparticles Illuminated With Laser Light May Be Able To Detect And Treat Cancer PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 20 July 2009 00:00

At a technical breakfast, Romain Quidant presented his research into the detection and treatment of cancer using gold nanoparticles illuminated with laser light. Quidant, who was recently awarded the Fresnel Prize 2009 that recognizes the highest level of excellence amongst emerging researchers in the field of photonics, is an ICREA researcher at the UPC's Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) and a fellow of the Cellex Foundation Barcelona.

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Laser Pulse Transforms Metal Grating into Nanodot Array PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 15 July 2009 08:54

http://images.iop.org/objects/nano/news/thumb/8/7/10/image1.jpgMetal nanodots are useful in many fields such as catalysis, environmental remediation, DNA detection and high-density data storage, to give just a few examples. Periodic arrays are required for certain applications and major fabrication methods include self-assembly-based wet chemical processes and lithography-based nanopatterning.

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Repulsive Side To Light Force Could Control Nanodevices PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 13 July 2009 09:53

http://www.sciencedaily.com/images/2009/07/090713131556.jpgThe team previously discovered an "attractive" force of light and showed how it could be manipulated to move components in semiconducting micro- and nano-electrical systems—tiny mechanical switches on a chip. The scientists have now uncovered a complementary repulsive force. Researchers had theorized the existence of both the attractive and repulsive forces since 2005, but the latter had remained unproven until now. The team, led by Hong Tang, assistant professor at Yale's School of Engineering & Applied Science, reports its findings in the July 13 edition of Nature Photonics's advanced online publication.

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Material World: Graphene’s Versatility Promises New Applications PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 10 July 2009 10:41

http://www.biodesign.asu.edu/images/photo/3110188521_4d9e0b934d_m-large.jpg?1247101853Since its discovery just a few years ago, graphene has climbed to the top of the heap of new super-materials poised to transform the electronics and nanotechnology landscape. As N.J. Tao, a researcher at the Biodesign Institute of Arizona State University explains, this two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms is exceptionally strong and versatile. Its unusual properties make it ideal for applications that are pushing the existing limits of microchips, chemical sensing instruments, biosensors, ultracapacitance devices, flexible displays and other innovations.

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NEMS Measure Mass PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 10 July 2009 08:21

http://images.iop.org/objects/nano/news/8/7/7/090707.jpgResearchers at Caltech have shown that an NEMS device can be used to detect the mass of protein molecules. The sensor could easily be scaled up and used to detect the masses of millions of proteins in an instant.

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Physicists Find Way to Control Individual Bits in Quantum Computers PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 08 July 2009 10:06

http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/images/09PHY016_latticearray_LR.jpgPhysicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have overcome a hurdle in quantum computer development, having devised* a viable way to manipulate a single "bit" in a quantum processor without disturbing the information stored in its neighbors. The approach, which makes novel use of polarized light to create "effective" magnetic fields, could bring the long-sought computers a step closer to reality.

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Researchers Enlist DNA to Bring Carbon Nanotubes' Promise Closer to Reality PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 08 July 2009 09:33

A team of researchers from DuPont and Lehigh University has reported a breakthrough in the quest to produce carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are suitable for use in electronics, medicine and other applications.

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Nanofibre-based Scaffold Mimics Biomaterial PDF Print E-mail
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Monday, 06 July 2009 09:14

http://images.iop.org/objects/nano/news/thumb/8/7/3/090703.jpgResearchers at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and colleagues at Tianjin University, China, have succeeded in making a bone-like material with graded mineral content. The new scaffold, which consists of calcium phosphate on a mat of nanofibres, could be ideal for connective tissue engineering because its mechanical stiffness varies continuously across the surface – a prerequisite for connecting two different biological materials, such as tendon and bone, together.

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Nano Measurement in the 3rd Dimension PDF Print E-mail
Monday, 06 July 2009 08:20

http://www.ptb.de/de/aktuelles/archiv/presseinfos/pi2009/bilder/090706.jpgFrom the motion sensor to the computer chip - in many products of daily life components are used whose functioning is based on smallest structures of the size of thousandths - or even millionths - of millimetres. These micro and nano structures must be manufactured and assembled with the highest precision so that in the end, the overall system will function smoothly. Thereby, details are important - and therefore scientists at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have developed a metrological scanning probe microscope into a micro and nano coordinate measuring instrument. This now allows dimensional quantities with nanometer resolution also to be measured on three-dimensional objects in an extraordinarily large measurement range of 25 mm x 25 mm x 5 mm. The new device is already extensively being used at PTB - to a large part for calibration orders from industry and research.

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